Government Agencies Discovering Social Media? Plus: Top Ten Hotels for Techies – This Week in Business Continuity

Houston TranStar command center.

Houston TranStar command center.

Early last week the Harris County Office of Emergency Management conducted a series of tabletop (more like work station) exercises in conjunction with Houston TranStar and a dozen other county, state and federal departments and agencies the goal of which was to familiarize their staff with better ways to utilize social media to engage the public in the event of a disaster.  Initially my response to this was, “Uh, yeah – it’s about time.”  But that reaction was wrong.  [Opinion Alert.]  Usually government entities designate tasks like perfecting their social media operations to a department like IT or the marketing division, if they have one, and those departments already have other elements to manage on a full-time basis.  But using social media to alert the general public is much more than a task and communicating the potential for a significant disruption or disaster, as well as how to best prepare for the event, are and should be the responsibility of a much larger subset of the agencies involved.  Making it part of the overall culture and prioritizing the continual perfection of the process, not to mention keeping track of the constant barrage of new online alerting techniques that continually pop up, well that’s just fantastic.

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There’s still time and a little room to register to attend the August 12th webinar, “The State of Readiness in the Private Sector – A Train Wreck in 2015 . . . What That Means to You” by Bo Mitchell.  That’s a Wednesday, the presentation is at 11:30 Eastern / 10:30 Central and you can find out more and register here.  Broken record: register even if you can’t attend so that you automatically receive the link to the recording afterwards.

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Okay all you Bucket Two types: this one’s for you.  (If you’re not sure which bucket you fall into, check out last week’s contracting excerpt.)  So.  Bucket Two Folks.  You have a travel management company that books your company’s hotels, cars and flights, and because you are such a well known organization and give these hotels regular business, your relationships are going to pull you through during a deployment.  Right?  Or something along those lines?

Wrong.

Take another look at our case study.  This was a company just like yours with a plan that looks eerily similar to yours.  At least, this was their plan before they had to actually test it through activation.  So why didn’t it work?

“Several reasons,” says Continuity Housing principal Michelle Lowther.  In the interest of time (and blog space) we’re going to take these one by one.  First, the travel agents were not company employees, so getting them to work the intense hours needed to manage deployment housing was impossible.  Since pre-guaranteed hotel rooms were not set up in advance, the company was booking people all over the place, creating a lot more [polldaddy poll=8994332 align=”right”]work for the bookers and a lot more headache for the people trying to keep track of who was staying where.  Even when they found rooms, in some cases they were not able to pin down someone with appropriate signing authority to sign off on hotel contracts, so they ended up losing those rooms.”  Read: the hotels had someone in the wings vying for those same rooms, and they opted for the bird in their hands.  “It’s catch as catch can for hotels trying to maximize their revenue during a crisis.  And like it or not, that’s exactly what their stakeholders expect them to do.”

More details to come, but in the meantime, we’d like to hear from you.  What mechanism does your company rely on to secure guaranteed housing in the event of a deployment?  If they rely on a travel management company, hit the survey on the right.

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Finally, if you’re in IT you’ll appreciate this and if you’re not, forward it to your favorite IT folks because they’ll appreciate it: The 10 Best Hotels for Techies.  Most of us won’t ever stay at most of those places – I like the retinal scan door locks at Boston’s Nine Zero property although 10 grand per night is a little steep – but it’s yet another example of the hotel industry customizing and innovating to the benefit of their target audiences . . . and the revenue they bring with them.  At Continuity Housing we keep a daily lookout for the best for our clients but do forward that one to your IT folks.  They’ll enjoy it.

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Continuity Housing helps companies enhance their business continuity plans by pre-arranging guaranteed housing and providing logistical support for mission-critical employees during disasters.  Subscribe to the Continuity Housing blog (in sidebar at right) and follow us on Twitter, on YouTube, on LinkedIn and on Facebook.  To subscribe to our mailing list and/or if you’d like a free 30-minute planning session, let us know.

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