Posts

U.S. Winter Outlook: Warmer North, Cooler South – How Will Your Plan Adapt? This Month in Business Continuity

If you’re reading this you already know that September is National Preparedness Month and if you watch Game of Thrones you know that winter is coming. Both are true and September is a great month to celebrate preparedness given that it’s usually the peak month for hurricane activity and yet fall is right around the corner. And now that we’re close to being on the heels of what’s been another blessedly quiet Atlantic tropical storm season, it’s time to shift attention to prep for potential winter disruptions.

Does your winter plan need to be updated? As you discuss what could be cut and what needs to be added, a great motivator for your team is to ask what lessons were learned from last winter. Depending on where you’re based, records both high and low were set across the U.S. and the nastiest of the truly bitter cold didn’t hit the Northeast until late in January and into February. Were any resources mistakenly re-allocated away from preparedness before the severe punch late in the season? What was the impact on the company and what could have been done more efficiently?

2015-09 Weather MapI’ve watched seasonal weather outlooks evolve in quality and specificity for more than 20 years – trust me, they’ve gotten a lot better at it – and NOAA’s current take on a continuing strong El Niño deserves respect – most of the other outlooks I’ve looked at concur with their position. Short version: warmer than usual in the north, colder than usual in the south and some rain for the West Coast, which can be both a good and a bad thing depending on how you feel about flash flooding and mudslides. Be informed, prepare and build robustness to protect against black swans. (And despite all this, always plan for the event, not for the seasonal outlook.)

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Personal Continuity: The Pros and Cons of Medic Alert Apps

We’ve all had ICE contacts on our phones for years and medic alert apps (link spoiler: awesome stock photo!) have been around for a while but now there are some newer ones that provide even more specific information to medical professionals in case of an emergency that involves, well, you. The good news is that these apps provide a great deal of information about you should the need arise. The bad news is that they provide a great deal of information about you to anyone who gets a hold of your phone. Unless you have a severe chronic health issue, is it worth the risk? Let us know what you think in the comments section. Knock on wood, I’m fairly healthy so for now I’m just sticking to the ICE. So to speak.

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Deployment Housing: Perfecting Your Backup Plan

Last week there was yet another great ACP Webinar Series presentation, this time by our own Michelle Lowther entitled, “How To Get What You Need From Hotels When Your Plan (And Your Business!) Depend On It.” If that topic interests you, all I’ll say is that the presentation is most definitely not a commercial and that it garnered a 4.6 out of 5 (92% excellent) average survey ranking by the people who attended live. Go watch and share it around because doing so will make you look good. In a nutshell, it very comprehensively details the many items you need to factor when including deployment housing in your BCP.

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Five Ways To Make The Most of Hotel Loyalty Programs

I’m not a regular follower of something called theeverygirl.com but I saw this the other day and thought it worth passing along. A couple of the pointers are just good common sense but two of them resonate: utilize your points for more than just travel (think local perks) and take advantage of discounts and benefits with program partners.

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Marriott Tests In-Room Virtual Reality Service

With competition ever fiercer, hotels continue to ramp up their customer enticements, and the latest comes from Marriott, piloting virtual reality headsets that guests can borrow for 24 hours at two flagship properties in New York and London. The 16-year-old in me absolutely loves the idea but 95% of what I use a hotel room for, whether traveling for business or pleasure, is to sleep. It’s a neat perk but after a long day of doing whatever, I don’t know if I need to strap on a headset for a quick trip to the Andes. What do you think about this one?

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Saudi King Books Entire Hotel

Speaking of black swans, we’ve all heard of entire floors being booked by royalty but the entire hotel?  How’s THAT for an unexpected potential interruption of your deployment accommodations plan? I worked in VVIP travel and event management for more than 20 years and things like this happen way more often than is covered in the media. Always, always hedge your bets.

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Continuity Housing helps companies enhance their business continuity plans by pre-arranging guaranteed housing and providing logistical support for mission-critical employees during disasters.  Subscribe to the Continuity Housing blog (in sidebar at right) and follow us on Twitter, on YouTube, on LinkedIn and on Facebook.  To subscribe to our mailing list and/or if you’d like a free 30-minute planning session, let us know.

Plan For Hidden Threats After A Disaster; Odd Storm Prep Behavior – This Week In Business Continuity

Over the last several weeks the general media has been describing the recent severe flooding across many parts of the central and southern U.S. with adjectives like ‘historic’ and ‘phenomenal.’  That’s debatable but it has been bad enough to cause considerable primary damage and destruction of property.  I say primary because now we’re beginning to see some of the after-effects of the original damage in the form of house fires caused by electrical problems brought on by the original flooding from the Memorial Day weekend storms.  Adding insult to injury, “The potential for fire after a flood can be traced to the wires, circuit panels, switches and outlets that were submerged in water.”

submerged-wiresWhen repairing, renovating or restoring your office, home, car or any other property after it’s been damaged in a similar event, never skimp.  Get the best, the bonded, the highest reviewed and consider what might be a higher repair cost to be an investment in the future.  And your peace of mind.

CenterPoint Energy has a great resource page full of links to storm-associated safety considerations to be aware of.  And while you’re at it, take a look at this fantastic and fairly short video about “Staying Alive When The Power Lines Come Downthat we produced last year and share it with anyone you care about.

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In advance of that received considerable media coverage, city and county officials along the Texas Gulf Coast urged citizens to take the standard storm precautions, prepare for the potential of outages and to gather storm supplies while they may.  Gather they did, emptying some stores of bottled panic-shoppers-billwater, beer, bread, batteries and other items.  The relative panic was such that midway through a normal grocery shopping trip, a friend of mine had her half-full shopping cart ‘appropriated’ by another customer because there weren’t any carts left to use.  Unfortunately, after the storm had passed both the mayor of Houston and the Harris county judge poked fun at the overreaction, moves that probably won’t inspire much confidence in either of them the next time they send out the call for people to get ready for a tropical event.  To quote Houston Chronicle Science Editor Eric Berger from an article the other day, “Politicians don’t understand weather.“

The U.S. Census estimates that around 3,000 people move to the Houston area each month, although I’ve heard numbers that range closer to 10,000 per month.  Splitting the difference, that means that in the 81 months since (the neighborhood’s last significant tropical event) nearly 530,000 people have move to the area.

That’s a lot of newbies, and a lot of people within that group who’ve never experienced a tropical storm or its attendant media hype.  No wonder they over-reacted to news reports about an event that, for many of us, turned out being just a couple of fairly rainy days.

Human behavior.  Always remember to take that into account when you’re refining your company’s organizational response plan.  It’s the most difficult aspect to prepare for but definitely one of the most important.

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We’d be remiss if we didn’t acknowledge the senseless church massacre in Charleston last Wednesday night.  Unfortunately such shootings continue to be an increasing reality in our lives.  If you didn’t attend either of the recent Association of Contingency Planners webinars on preparing for and responding to an active shooter, we’ve posted them for you to watch and share with anyone you’d like to.  Part one from April 7th is here and part two recorded last week is here.  The presenter is outstanding and both webinars are about as full as they possibly can be of useful information and instruction.

If you don’t have the time to watch both or either of the webinars, there’s also the much shorter video produced by the City of Houston in 2012 and it can be found here.

Our thoughts and heartfelt prayers continue to be with the families and friends of those killed and injured.

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watch

Image: Apple

I don’t have one (yet?) but here’s another reason to consider getting one of the new smart watches: “Members of Marriott Rewards program who have purchased the Apple Watch will be able to use it globally to access check-in and check-out, get real-time room-ready alerts, view the nearest hotel and next reservation, and see rewards account details.”  Details are available here.  Starwood and Hilton worldwide are also rolling out similar watch-based amenities.  Yet another example of the best and brightest hotel chains providing guests with new and appealing options in an ever-competitive environment.

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Continuity Housing helps companies enhance their business continuity plans by pre-arranging guaranteed housing and providing logistical support for mission-critical employees during disasters.  Subscribe to the Continuity Housing blog (in sidebar at right) and follow us on Twitter, on YouTube, on LinkedIn and on Facebook.  To subscribe to our mailing list and/or if you’d like a free 30-minute planning session, let us know.

$500 Million In Losses In The Last Week. Is Your Company Deployed Because of The Blizzard?

This article in The Boston Globe about massive economic losses due to severe weather is a couple of days old but the only thing that’s not current about it is, ironically, the verb tense.  “Caused” should be updated to “still causing” given that for the third Monday in a row – with a couple of other smaller systems thrown into the mix in the interim – massive amounts of snow are falling in the northeast U.S. causing schools, highways and many, many businesses to shut down.

FEMA-declaresGranted, that figure pales in comparison to the damage caused by a typical hurricane.  1991’s hurricane Bob is the 32nd costliest storm in recorded U.S. history with more than $2 billion in damages but have you ever even heard of Bob?  Nonetheless, $500 million is a lot of money.  And the northeast U.S. isn’t faring any better this week.  Cindy Fitzgibbon, Boston meteorologist with WCVB, said this morning that prior to January 23rd, Boston had only received about 5″ of snow this season but more than 6 feet of it in the 18 days since.

Given that severe weather is the number one reason FEMA declares disasters in the U.S., it makes me wonder how many companies have had to finally deploy staff to fail-over sites in order to ensure division or enterprise continuity.  Similar in scale if not in origin, it reminds me of Continuity Housing’s handling of the urgent, massive and substantially prolonged need for deployment housing following the tragic Deepwater Horizon incident in 2010.  At the peak of the response – which itself lasted four years  – housing management was provided for thousands of people each night – month after month – saving millions of dollars for our client, not to mention sparing them the headache of managing the logistics of whose head was on which pillow in what building, as well as a nightmarish stack of invoices.

Photo: wn.com

Snow in Boston this week. Photo: wn.com

Is your company or organization currently deploying staff to keep operations running smoothly in response to the blizzards?  If so, how’s it going?  Comment (anonymously if you prefer) below.  Business continuity management only improves with each shared experience and that’s the permanent goal: improving the solutions that we provide for our employers, our clients, our vendors, our employees and their families (and even their pets, if necessary).  Here’s hoping the onslaught from Mother Nature lets up in the coming days and weeks.  After all, the spring severe weather season is right around the corner.  And then comes June 1st.

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Both of the most recent webinars in the Association of Contingency Planners webinar series are now up and available for viewing at your leisure.  Complete descriptions for both are available at the links below where you can watch.

  • Recent Developments: ISO/Technical Committee 292, Security. Watch here.
  • Bioterrorism Preparedness for Businesses: How to Stay Operational, Even During an Anthrax Attack. Watch here.

Posted by Fred Rogers on 10 February 2015.

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Continuity Housing helps companies enhance their business continuity plans by pre-arranging guaranteed housing and providing logistical support for mission-critical employees during disasters.  Subscribe to the Continuity Housing blog (in sidebar at right) and follow us on Twitter, on YouTube, on LinkedIn and on Facebook.  To subscribe to our mailing list and/or if you’d like a free 30-minute consultation, let us know.

BCP Smart: Make Early December Count So You Can Enjoy The Holidays (and 2015) Even More

It’s only early December but many of us have already experienced a substantial winter weather disruption from last week’s near-historic snowfall and then flooding in the Northeast U.S. And then there’s this week’s crazy amount of rain on the West Coast.  Barring any other similar problems, here are a few ideas to make the most of what’s usually a slow month so that you can leave the office AT the office when the holidays start.

  • buckleSpend a day summarizing this year’s numbers: quantify results and subjectively but accurately reiterate the value to your organization in terms of dollars saved and the crises – big and small – that were avoided or successfully mitigated. Give your boss, and your career, a boost with a short summary of why intelligent BCP counts for your company.
  • Finalize your 2015 budget and consider those previously unconsidered solutions that could very well make 2015’s year-end report even shinier. [Insert shameless plug for the wild range of solutions and savings provided by Continuity Housing here.]
  • After you get those two done, if you find yourself with a little free time on the clock, as always go for some professional self-improvement. Check out Continuity Housing’s YouTube channel for videos on a wide range of topics that you may have missed this year.   We’re always working to help make your job easier and your value to your company even more bullet-proof, and this is where we keep the good stuff.  Well, except for the secret sauce.  We don’t put that in writing anywhere.
  • Ponder a new certification or two for 2015 and think about how you could get the company to co-sponsor or fully fund it. And not all CE efforts have to be ‘official’ in order for them to make you a more valuable contributor to your organization.  Explore CERT training – search local options available by ZIP here – or some of the options available via Ready.gov, which can be a bit on the remedial side for most of us but a little recurrent training never hurt anybody.
  • Consider a life skills or survival course. Get yourself and all of your key, cross-trained managers updated with an in-office, half-day CPR and emergency response course.  The Red Cross offers training but in many regions of the country there are even more in-depth immediate response courses available at a fairly low cost.  What skill have you always admired in others but never tackled yourself?  Make that an achievable resolution for next year as a gift to yourself.
  • If you’re not yet a member, take 5 minutes and go join the Association of Contingency Planners. It’s not expensive, you will benefit from it and . . . it looks good on your LinkedIn profile and résumé.
  • Make your New Year’s resolutions. Admittedly, I never make them.  Bear with me here…  I prefer systems to goals in order to create patterns that lead to success.  But resolutions can be good for thinking outside the box.  (For instance, I’ve long wanted to come up with a replacement to the phrase ‘outside the box’ because it’s tired.)  How about you consider making just two resolutions for how you can better yourself and the processes your coworkers use to increase the value of all of you to your organization?  Easy enough to do, and it involves the whole team (for those of you lucky enough to have one of those).
  • Finally and right before you head out the door for the year, consider hosting a “best new suggestion” contest with your coworkers for what your group might explore in the new year to make your business continuity plan more resilient. No need to award a trip to Tahiti or even an iPad; in general, people get pretty excited about a $25 cash card.  I know I do.  Free money is awesome.
  • All this just a little too ambitious? At the very least, learn something valuable while you’re surfing the web waiting for the 20th or so to get here!

I’m certainly not saying you have to do all of these things, but I hope you’ll pick (and do) your two or three favorites.  Then buckle down for the next couple of weeks and say goodbye to 2014 with a confident smile.

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Continuity Housing helps companies enhance their business continuity plans by pre-arranging guaranteed housing and providing logistical support for mission-critical employees during disasters.  Subscribe to the Continuity Housing blog (in sidebar at right) and follow us on Twitter, on YouTube, on LinkedIn and on Facebook.  To subscribe to our mailing list and/or if you’d like a free 30-minute consultation, let us know.

Two of the Best Business Continuity Planning Webinars I’ve Seen Now Available on YouTube

I’ve been presenting and producing GoToWebinars (Citrix rocks) since 2006 and on Tuesday I was a small part of two of the best I’ve ever seen, much less produced.  The presentations, part of the ACP national webinar series, were part of a simulcast of the monthly meeting of the Connecticut Chapter of the Association of Contingency Planners (ACP) held at the headquarters of Northeast Utilities in Berlin, CT and they were emceed, as usual, by the ineffable Dr. Edward Goldberg, CBCP, CBCA, Corporate ACP’s Education Committee Chair.  (Hey, other regional ACP chapters!  Interested in doing something like this? Email me.)

grittyBoth of the unusually fast-paced webinars were not only educational but also entertaining and both were, frankly, a bit gritty, by which I mean that neither one pulled any punches when it came to sharing valuable information that any BCP professional would benefit from knowing.  The first one covered the reality of how human responses, especially in the age of lightspeed social media, have the potential to make any crisis a little bit or a whole lot worse and how to stay ahead of the potential spiral that can ensue.  The second webinar was an invaluable snapshot of what you have no clue about relevant to accommodating people with physical challenges – your employees, your coworkers, your friends – in the event of a crisis.  Most of the several presenters are disabled and they weren’t reluctant to share specific pointers about what to do and what not to do when you’re assisting a disabled person in any situation.

If you missed the presentations, we’ve edited them to run individually but I suggest you make the time to watch them both.  If you don’t think you can commit to an hour for each, watch the first ten minutes of each.  Then you’ll understand.  Go watch:

Incidentally, the second webinar had to be cut short so we plan on re-presenting that one in full, probably within a few months.  I’ll post information about that one and the link to register when the time comes.

That Connecticut chapter?  They're a wild bunch. Photo: Edward Goldberg

That Connecticut chapter? They’re a wild bunch.
Photo: Edward Goldberg

We’ve got one more ACP webinar planned this year, The Importance of a Resilient Supply Chain, Monday, November 24th at 11:00 Eastern / 10:00 Central.  Register here and be sure to register even if you can’t attend so that you receive the link to the recording.  More:

Contingency planning goes beyond making sure you have your own plans in place. Supply chains are becoming ever more complex and it is easy to lose track of them, but if you do lose track then you could be opening up your organization to a disaster. A disruption anywhere within the supply chain may well have a significant impact on all the other organizations within it. Results from the Business Continuity Institute’s annual Supply Chain Resilience survey showed just how big an impact these disruptions can have and how frequently they occur. It is no longer enough to ensure that you have your own contingency plan in place, it is vital to ensure that everyone within your supply chain has one too. Presented by Patrick Alcantara, Research Associate at the Business Continuity Institute and Andrew Scott, Senior Communications Manager at the Business Continuity Institute.

Presenters at the ACP Connecticut Chapter meeting.  Back row: Jeff Heisner, Steve Crimando, Cynthia Simeone, Stephen Thal, Keenan the Wonderdog. Front row: Mary Ann Langton. Photo: Edward Goldberg

Presenters at the ACP Connecticut Chapter meeting. Back row: Jeff Heisner, Steve Crimando, Cynthia Simeone, Stephen Thal, Keenan the Wonderdog.
Front row: Mary Ann Langton. Photo: Charles Jones

And we’re already lining up presentations for next year for current and future ACP members to enjoy.  As always, feel free to recommend topics and let me know if you yourself have a presentation you’d like us to consider.  For an idea of the wide variety of types of other BCP presentations we’ve hosted, check out Continuity Housing’s YouTube channel.

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Continuity Housing helps companies enhance their business continuity plans by pre-arranging guaranteed housing and providing logistical support for mission-critical employees during disasters.  Subscribe to the Continuity Housing blog (in sidebar at right) and follow us on Twitter, on YouTube, on LinkedIn and on Facebook.  To subscribe to our mailing list and/or if you’d like a free 30-minute consultation, let us know.

An ACP Webinar Series Two-Fer: Two Business Continuity Webinars in One on November 11

I’ve produced more than 200 webinars in the last 8 years and as the average national attention span continues to decrease I have consistently lobbied employers and clients to think shorter – that anything longer than 25 or 35 minutes is going to result in lower registration and attendance.  So why in the world would I encourage you to attend a 2-hour webinar?  Because it’s two separate webinars about two different and very important topics: “Human Factors in Business Continuity Planning” and “Accommodating People with Disabilities in Business Continuity Planning and Emergency Response.”

two-ferThe webinar itself is a live simulcast of next Tuesday’s ACP Connecticut Chapter monthly meeting that will take place Tuesday, November 11th from noon to 2:00 Eastern.  The simulcast is a novel idea but not experimental; ACP hosted a similar meeting broadcast – sort of a proof of concept gig – of the San Francisco Chapter meeting earlier in the year and it went very well.  Specifics of each of the two meetings are below but here’s why you should register to attend:

  • Again, two great topics and if you’re only interested in one of them, go ahead and register so that you’ll receive the automated notification of when the entire broadcast is posted on YouTube so that at your leisure you can watch just the segment that you’re interested in.
  • If you’re in an ACP chapter leadership position, this is a great way to gain insight on how another chapter runs its meetings. There’s always room for improvement and here’s a chance for you to learn something you might not already know.
  • Job security. Any opportunity to improve your BC knowledge base – not to mention your organization’s duty of care obligation – makes you that much valuable to your organization.
  • This is long-distance meeting technology at its best and might change the way you conduct similar meetings for your own organization in the future.
  • Finally, it’s not often that folks from different parts of the country get to get together in a virtual setting with common interests, concerns, etc. And don’t hesitate to email me before the 11th with any questions you have for the presenters of either of the webinars.

Presentation specifics from ACP:

  • “Human Factors in Business Continuity Planning”presented by Cynthia Simeone and Steve Crimando. Cynthia is an expert in business continuity planning and Steve is a behavioral scientist and they’ll outline key psychological and behavioral considerations across the four phases of emergency management (mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery). Cynthia introduces a BCP challenge for each phase, and Steve introduces research and case studies/examples to help the BC Planner make accurate behavioral assumptions specific to that phase and the unique challenge, then they together suggest or offer ways to apply that information in a practical manner in policy, planning, procedures and/or exercises.
  • “Accommodating People with Disabilities in Business Continuity Planning and Emergency Response” presented by Steven Thal, Connecticut Capital Region Emergency Planning Committee and Jeff Heisner, independent consultant. Steven has more than 40 years of professional and volunteer work to provide training and increase public education on blindness and eye care. Jeff Heisner is a seasoned business continuity and disaster recovery expert.
Lovely Connecticut in November.  Unfortunately this foliage will not be part of the webinar.   Photo: Danbury Patch

Lovely Connecticut in November. Unfortunately
this foliage will not be part of the webinar.
Photo: Danbury Patch

Register here now and of course share this with anyone you think might be interested.  As always, the ACP webinar series events are free to attend courtesy of the sponsorship provided by Continuity Housing.

We’ll see you next Tuesday . . . and just in case you have not already done so, it’s not too late to register for this Thursday’s webinar which occurs at 1:00 Central / 2:00 Eastern: “Business Continuity Management and Cyberterrorism – How it Affects Us and What You Should Be Doing Now.” The presenter is Al Berman, president of DRI International and it’s not surprising that registration passed the 600 mark this morning.  Find out more and register now here.  As always, register even if you can’t attend so that you automatically receive the link to the recorded version afterward.

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Continuity Housing helps companies enhance their business continuity plans by pre-arranging guaranteed housing and providing logistical support for mission-critical employees during disasters.  Subscribe to the Continuity Housing blog (in sidebar at right) and follow us on Twitter, on YouTube, on LinkedIn and on Facebook.  To subscribe to our mailing list and/or if you’d like a free 30-minute consultation, let us know.

Two Reasons for BC Professionals to Join the Association of Contingency Planners: Better Results For You and More Money (Also For You)

I’m probably a little shy of the age (that’s my story and I’m stickin’ to it!) when I can use phrases like “back in the day” but I don’t remember there ever being so very many options for different industry organizations to join.  I remember groups like the American Institute of Architects and the American Medical Association – old school professional organizations that seem to have been around for eons.  Now, however, and especially with the explosion of activity on LinkedIn, there seem to be half a dozen DONT-KEEP-SECRETSprofessional organizations for every industry, sub-industry, niche profession and one-of-a-kind vocation on the planet.  If you’re a left-handed pediatric veterinary cosmetic micro-surgeon, there’s a place for you.  The dilemma we sometimes face now: too many options.  But for BC pros, the Association of Contingency Planners makes it an easy choice.

Naturally the Association provides a number of excellent reasons for joining but for me it boils down to a single reason: opportunity.  Or maybe two single reasons: opportunity that leads to more money earned and more money saved by our clients.  Then there are the opportunities for education, networking and enhancement of my company’s BC and DR plans and suddenly, joining up makes a whole lot of sense. Annual dues (just $125) are pro-rated monthly so if you join this month you only have to pay for the rest of this year.  It’s a bargain.  Full disclosure: I don’t work for ACP in any capacity but Continuity Housing is indeed working with the Association in order to re-introduce their popular and free webinar series for its members.

[Speaking of which . . . the first of the webinar series will be “Securing Guaranteed Hotel Rooms For Your Organization In a Deployment: A Tale of Two Companies (Case Studies)” on Tuesday, August 12th at 10:30 Central presented by yours truly.  There are more than 60 negotiable terms in a hotel’s group booking contract, and this session will equip you with creative, unique ways to craft those contracts to your organization’s best advantage to fit the unique aspects of a crisis management booking.  Find out more and register for this free, fast-paced, 45-minute webinar here.]

So what’s the ROI on joining the ACP?  Results will vary depending on your level of commitment but let’s take a little field trip across the last eight years of my professional life:

  • 2006: I created Continuity Housing’s patent-pending program to guarantee companies hotel rooms on a contingency basis without having to pay an arm and a leg for them.
  • 2009: I joined ACP. (Should’ve joined earlier.)
    • Which begat a presentation I made to a local chapter about avoiding the pitfalls of securing guaranteed housing for critical personnel in the event of a disaster and/or a business interruption.
    • Which led to me being asked to present similar material to other chapters.
    • Which resulted in me getting to meet ImpactWeather’s business continuity team managed by Ed Schlichtenmyer and, at that time, Mike Thomson who asked me to present not once but twice at the company’s annual Hurricane Symposium.
    • Which in turn introduced me to Ed Goldberg enabling me to present in a number of the original ACP Webinar Series which started in 2011.
    • Which fomented (I’m running out of terms that mean “which led to”) a continuing series of invitations for me to make presentations at national industry conferences hosted by Continuity Insights, EEI, ACP and CPM – as well as the webinar next month for ACP (we posted about that this past Wednesday) and presentations to local ACP chapters in CA, CT, FL, MA, NY, TX and WA.
    • And they told two friends, and they told two friends, and so on, and so on, and so on… (Click here if you’re too young to understand that reference.)
  • And all along the way and with increasing frequency, Continuity Housing has been exposed to more opportunities. And by opportunities, I mean contracts.  And by contracts, I mean revenue.

Also as a direct result of my membership, I got one degree closer to Kevin Bacon.  Just kidding.  Although that would be awesome and I encourage you to check out The Following some week.

And no, it’s not all, or even mostly, about the monetary gain.  It’s the less tangible bennies that keep me coming back to ACP.

acp-webinars-awesomeOne of the Continuity Housing team members goes fairly far offshore to fish from time to time and more than once in the past he’s told me about the informal but rigidly obeyed tradition of mariners helping each other out whenever a nearby crew or their boat is in trouble and that the entire BC community acts in much the same way.  We don’t keep secrets.  We share what we learn so that we all get better at what we do and learn new ways to keep even more people more efficiently out of harm’s way.  In fact, we attended a gathering the week before last hosted by the South Texas Chapter (see photo) and had a great time learning some new things, making some new connections and reconnections and hearing about what’s next, which for this particular chapter is a  very cool 90-minute boat tour of the Port of Houston in mid-August before the monthly chapter meeting and lunch.

So that’s what you get out of the ACP.  An engaged, devoted community, new approaches, better results.  And that’s the real benefit.

The best looking, most interesting ACP local chapter in America.  Click to enlarge.

The best looking, most interesting ACP local chapter in America. Click to enlarge.

For more information – including where your nearest chapter meets – visit the ACP website and click on the Membership tab at the top.

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Continuity Housing helps companies enhance their business continuity plans by pre-arranging guaranteed housing and providing logistical support for mission-critical employees during disasters.  Subscribe to the Continuity Housing blog (in sidebar at right) and follow us on Twitter, on YouTube, on LinkedIn and on Facebook.  To subscribe to our mailing list and/or to find out about a free 30-minute consultation, let us know.